Overview On Childcare Training Books

References are essential for every student like those who take childcare training programs today. They need to read books and modules that can help them with their training. It’s essential to get the right references to learn countless things in this field. But aside from learning purposes, these books can also be used by people to know more about the program they’re about to take.

There are many schools offering this course and several of them are able to create their own references or books for their own training program. References are meant to match their set curriculum and let their students use it.

Aside from using it for learning, childcare training schools may also use these books to help future students understand their programs. these books are made specifically for their programs and curriculums so future students will know what they can learn from these schools.

People know that taking the best program is not only about the length of classes but the actual things to learn. Books made by these schools will definitely be a great help among students who would like to have an idea about what they will learn within these facilities. They can gauge whether the childcare training program is comprehensive or not. Since experts made these references themselves for the school, it will directly reflect the types of classes they conduct. This is essential for some students since they will be attending these classes. They need to know how much they would learn in the process.

The good thing about these schools is a number of them give out a sample of their books to future students so they will learn more about their programs. This may not be a complete copy of the book but just a sample of what they will learn. It includes description of their contents to just give an overview of childcare training programs.

However, not all schools would give them out for free. Some may sell a copy of this course overview book to help them with their needs. Book prices may differ depending on the schools that offer them. Others can be very affordable while others may be charged a bit more. Students just need to look for the most affordable option or just go with their curriculum in knowing the courses.

In conclusion, learning to find the best schools where they can enroll is very important. These overview books are available to introduce not only the childcare training programs but also the schools that offer them. Finding these overview books is possible through the internet and with the help of different schools that have these programs to help future childcare aspirers to be experts.

Hudson Heads Nchgr Policy Office

Kathy Hudson has joined the NIH National Center for Human Genome Research (NCHGR) as Assistant Director for Policy Coordination. As head of the newly created Office for Policy Coordination, Hudson will be responsible for the Office of Communications, Office of Program Planning, and Office of Legislation.

Before joining NCHGR, Hudson was Senior Policy Analyst in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the Department of Health and Human Services. She advised the Assistant Secretary on national health and science policy issues involving NIH. Before that, she was a Congressional Science fellow.

Hudson’s training and professional experiences will provide focus and leadership in public policy and public affairs issues relating to NCHGR programs. She will coordinate NCHGR Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications activities.

Hudson received her B.A. in biology at Carleton College in Minnesota, M.S. in microbiology from the University of Chicago, and Ph.D. in molecular biology from the University of California, Berkeley. She has received numerous awards, including the Secretary’s Special Recognition Award, Assistant Secretary for Health Special Recognition Award, and science fellowships from the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment and American Society for Microbiology.

Carbon Capture And Storage

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an approach to mitigating climate change by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) from large point sources such as power plants and subsequently storing it away safely instead of releasing it into the atmosphere. Technology for capturing of CO2 is already commercially available for large CO2 emitters, such as power plants. Storage of CO2, on the other hand, is a relatively untried concept and as yet (2006) no power plant operates with a full carbon capture and storage system. Currently, United States government has approved the construction of world’s first CCS power plant, FutureGen, while BP has indicated that it intends to develop a 350 MW carbon capture and storage plant in Scotland, in which the carbon from natural gas will be stripped out and pumped into the Miller field in the North Sea.

CCS applied to a modern conventional power plant could reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by approximately 80-90% compared to a plant without CCS. Capturing and compressing CO2 requires a great deal of energy and would increase the fuel needs of a plant with CCS by 10-40%. These and other system costs are estimated to increase the cost of energy from a power plant with CCS by 30-60% depending on the specific circumstances.

Storage of the CO2 is envisaged either in deep geological formations, deep oceans, or in the form of mineral carbonates. Geological formations are currently considered the most promising, and these are estimated to have a storage capacity of at least 2000 Gt CO2. IPCC estimates that the economic potential of CCS could be between 10% and 55% of the total carbon mitigation effort until year 2100.

Capturing and compressing CO2 requires much energy, significantly raising the costs of operation, apart from the added investment costs. It would increase the energy needs of a plant with CCS by about 10-40%. This, the costs of storage, and other system costs are estimated to increase the costs of energy from a power plant with CCS by 30-60%, depending on the specific circumstances.

The costs of CCS are dominated by costs of capture. The storage is relatively cheap, geological storage in saline formations or depleted oil or gas fields typically cost $0.5-8 per ton of CO2 injected, plus an additional $0.1-0.3 for monitoring costs. However, when storage is combined with Enhanced oil recovery to extract extra oil from an oil field, the storage could yield net benefits of $10-16 per ton of CO2 injected (based on 2003 oil prices).

Oniang’o Sees Urgent Need For Food Biotechnology In Africa

Twenty-five percent of the undernourished people in the developing world are located in sub-Saharan Africa; and according to FAO, approximately 35 percent of the population in 14 countries in this region are chronically undernourished. However, efforts to reduce hunger have been hampered by a shortage of arable land, inadequate rainfall, low soil fertility and the devastating effects of plant pests and diseases.

“I’ve been saddened. I’ve gotten frustrated at the levels of hunger, levels of food insecurity on this continent, food crises one after another,” says The Honorable Ruth Oniang’o, a member of the Parliament of Kenya and Professor of Food Science and Nutrition at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology. “We have not always been food insecure. I think what has happened is we have not kept up with the world events, with the technologies. ? And I don’t know of any country, which developed without using science and technology.”

Increasing or intensifying food production is key to reducing hunger in sub-Saharan Africa, where 50-75 percent of the population and labor force is engaged in agriculture. Most of the African people earn their living by producing food, which means a family’s income-earning potential is closely linked to agricultural productivity. Increases in agricultural productivity also positively impact rural economies by increasing food availability, reducing food prices in local markets, and generating an increased demand for other products linked to agriculture.

“And so I believe that it is incumbent on our government and on our scientists ? to bring a technology, which can address a small-scale farmer,” says Dr. Oniang’o, founder and executive director of Rural Outreach Program ? a not-for-profit organization that undertakes development activities aimed at improving the livelihoods of the rural poor in Kenya, more than 55 percent of whom live below the poverty line. “They need different kinds of information, and I believe that science has now come up with this technology ? biotechnology. I’m not saying it’s going to be a magic bullet, but surely it should be one of the major approaches to use.”

Using food biotechnology, researchers can provide protection against plant pests and diseases through the seed, requiring small-scale farmers to use few ? if any ? additional inputs or machinery. Modern food biotechnology has been identified as the most potent technology for rescuing Africa from the effects of food shortages, just as the Green Revolution did for the countries of Southeast Asia in the 1970s.

“And, we already have situations where we know this is working. In South Africa, I’m aware and I’ve been there ? it is working. You know, when we’re hungry, we actually import maize from South Africa. So for us to sit here telling ourselves ? oh, we don’t want biotech food, and ? we can’t bring this to our farmers ? it is not right,” continues Oniang’o, who has influenced research, development and discourse on food security and nutrition in Africa, as well as globally.

Biotech varieties of cotton, corn and soy are approved for commercial planting in South Africa and account for approximately 92 percent of cotton, 29 percent of corn and 59 percent of soybeans grown in the country. While South Africa is currently the only country with commercial plantings of food biotechnology crops, nine countries have conducted field trials in Africa including Burkina Faso, Egypt, Kenya, Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe. An additional 11 countries are engaged in food biotechnology research and development.

“What I would like is to see a situation where families can feed themselves,” says Oniang’o. “I believe we should start now. We can’t say we shall start in a decade, or next year. No, no, no. We need to start now.”

? 2007 Monsanto Company. All rights reserved. The copyright holder consents to the use of this material and the images in the published context only and solely for the purpose of promoting the benefits of agricultural biotechnology.